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Graduate Alumni

Our Graduate Alumni are thriving in a variety of academic and academic adjacent careers. Institutions at which they teach and/or hold academic administrative positions include some of the top liberal arts colleges and research institutions in the United States. Our graduate program also prepares doctoral candidates for a variety of related careers, such as European Studies librarian and fellowships program officer.

Katharine Hargrave

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Katharine Hargrave

Katharine Hargrave is Director of the Foreign Language Tutoring Lab and Instructor of French at the College of Charleston. She received her Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in 2020. Her research focuses on the intersections between music and society in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century France and the French diaspora. Her current book project, Lyric Tragedy and Libretto Print Culture in Early Modern France, argues for the study of operas as literary texts used by the French to serve both political and colonial goals. Through the lens of material culture, she examines how the published format of lyric tragedies had a negative impact on public reception, subsequently diminishing recognition of the genre’s potential to influence contemporary society.

Elizabeth Tuttle

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Elizabeth Tuttle

Elizabeth Tuttle is Assistant Professor of French at Michigan State University. She received her PhD from the Pennsylvania State University in 2019. Her current book project focuses on political activism in 1920s and 30s France. She examines how print culture shaped both feminist and anti-imperialist movements in metropolitan France and throughout the empire. In case studies on Paris, French West Africa, Indochina, and French Guiana her work looks at how women and men used political ephemera to create coalitions and contest their marginalization.

Andrew Jones

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Andrew Jones

Professor Andrew Jones is Assistant Professor of French at Ursinus College. He received his Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in 2019. His interdisciplinary teaching and research bridge twentieth and twenty-first century French and Francophone Studies, Film Studies, Philosophy, and History. Specializing in the cinemas and literatures of postwar France, Francophone Africa, and Francophone Eastern Europe, he has a particular interest in representations of trauma. His current project explores the notion of testimony through the lens of cinematic storytelling in the wake of extreme human catastrophes including the Holocaust, Colonialism, and the Gulag.

Johann Le Guelte

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Johann Le Guelte

Johann Le Guelte is Assistant Professor of French and Francophone studies and French Program Coordinator at Xavier University. He received his Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in 2019. His research investigates the visual politics of the interwar French empire. In his current book project, tentatively titled "Visual Empire: Photography and the State in Interwar France and Senegal," he examines the production and reception of colonial photographic propaganda to determine how state-sponsored photographs became official colonial information. In interwar France, these images were often presented as irrefutable evidence to support the need for the mission to civilize, an idea that long influenced France’s colonial imaginary. Le Guelte’s work also examines transnational instances of photographic resistance in both French West Africa and metropolitan France, where “deviant” expressions of democratic photography continually challenged the state’s attempted creation of a visual empire. 

Lauren Tilger

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Lauren Tilger

Lauren Tilger is First Deputy for the Montgomery County, PA, Prothonotary. She earned her Ph.D. in French and Women's Studies from the Pennsylvania State University in 2016. Her work examined crossdressing protagonists in nineteenth-century French literature; she argued that the characters partook in transgender practices and that these literary representations created a space for the possibility of social transformation. Tilger now works in local government for an office where County residents file legal matters, including eviction appeals and protection from abuse petitions.