Penn State Penn State: College of the Liberal Arts
Events

Events

Feb 11, 2022
11:00AM
– 1:00PM
226 Burrowes Building

Marie Paillard

Candidate for the PhD in French

CREOLIZING EXPLORATIONS: TRAJECTORIES, RELATION, AND DECENTERING IMAGINARIES IN FRANCOPHONE CARIBBEAN AND INDIAN OCEAN FICTIONS
 

Friday, February 11, 2022

11:00 a.m. EST

226 Burrowes Building

All are welcome to attend!

Dissertation Committee:

Emmanuel Bruno Jean-François (Dissertation Adviser; Associate Professor of French and Francophone Studies and Comparative Literature)

Bénédicte Monicat (Professor of French and Women’s Studies)

Jennifer Boittin (Associate Professor of French, Francophone Studies and History)

Magalí Armillas-Tiseyra (Associate Professor of Comparative Literature)


Bruno Thibault (Professor of French Literature, University of Delaware, Special Member)

Abstract

In “Creolizing Explorations: Trajectories, Relation, and Decentering Imaginaries in Francophone Caribbean and Indian Ocean Fictions,” I examine literary representations of marginal experiences in the context of transnational migration. I foreground my concept, creolizing explorations, as an integrated and comparative framework that brings together fictions from Creole islands: Mauritius, Guadeloupe, Haiti, la Réunion. I underscore how these works recalibrate our understanding of migrant experience in the context of globalization, by staging representations of creolizing processes through the exploration of and adaptation to new cultural geographies, sociolinguistic realities, and natural environments.

I consider eight novels by authors Marie-Célie Agnant, Carl de Souza, Emmanuel Genvrin, Émile Ollivier, Gisèle Pineau, Barlen Pyamootoo, and Amal Sewtohul. While predominant representations of migrants from the Global South tend to deprive them of their histories, memories, and subjectivities, I argue that these texts confer a different agency to migrants relocating from Creole islands to continental spaces, by depicting them as active agents of change and creolization and, I contend, as explorers.

Nov 16, 2021
1:30PM

Join us to hear a current TAPIF participant (Cody Harpster ’20) talk about his experiences with the program and share tips for applying.

Nov 16, 2021
11:00AM
– 12:00PM

Come hear FFS doctoral students Katie Ellis, Ryan Pilcher and Aaron Witcher present their research conducted during a FA 21 HI residency.

HI flyer
Oct 27, 2021
7:00PM
– 8:00PM

Summer 2022: Besançon Intensive French Language and Cultural Immersion.

Learn about how you can earn 7 credits to put you well on your way to the minor or major!

Two Info Nights!

In Person: Tuesday, October 26th in 67 Willard at 7:00pm

On Zoom: Wednesday, October 27th at 7:00pm

Oct 26, 2021
7:00PM
– 8:00PM
67 Willard Building

Summer 2022: Besançon Intensive French Language and Cultural Immersion.

Learn about how you can earn 7 credits to put you well on your way to the minor or major!

Two Info Nights!

In Person: Tuesday, October 26th in 67 Willard at 7:00pm

On Zoom: Wednesday, October 27th at 7:00pm

Sep 15, 2021
1:00PM
– 2:00PM

“Pour nous en préserver”: On Genre Innovation and the Representational Ethics of Transfeminine Care Work in 21st Century Francophone Island Narratives 

by Eric Disbro 

In her short story “Abandoning myself…” (2010), Magali Marson’s protagonist says of her dear friend, Nirina, “Yes, Nirina was “him,” and I hadn’t seen it throughout all those nights. She had her Chinese mother’s delicate features; she was all gentle femininity. Sometimes I thought that her voice was low, a little husky, but no, I hadn’t figured it out.” In these final lines of the story, Nirina’s trans identity is revealed to the protagonist and readers alike; both find themselves mentally rewinding the plot of the story to think through its pivotal moments now imbued with gendered ambiguity. Marson’s story is exemplary of the genre that I call the “trans reveal narrative” in which a character’s trans/non-binary identity is revealed in the denouement of the plot. Contextualizing this nascent genre in francophone island literatures, I examine prior identifiable tropes of transfemininity that have found a place in 21st-century novels of the same regions, specifically the way transfeminine characters fill the roles of surrogate mothers for cisgender adolescents. I ask, then, how do trans reveal narratives highlight more concretely the burden of care assigned to trans characters, and how can this genre engage reading publics in the daily work of mutual aid?  

Apr 30, 2021
3:00PM
– 4:30PM
Apr 20, 2021
12:00PM
– 1:00PM

Morgane Haesen, Department of French and Francophone Studies
“See Everything, Say Nothing, and Flatter the Rascal”: Charles Massenet’s War World I Diary”

Timothée Valentin, Department of French and Francophone Studies
“It is a Good Carnival Day”: Race and Gender in Guadeloupean Socialist Propoganda

Merve Tabur, Department of Comparative Literature
“Ends of Language in the Anthropocene”: Environmental Futures and Planetary Aesthetics in Middle Eastern Speculative Fiction