Penn State Penn State: College of the Liberal Arts
Events

Events

Dec 5, 2022
2:30PM
– 3:30PM
226 Burrowes Building and Zoom

Anjali Prabhu is Professor and Edward W. Said Chair in Comparative Literature at UCLA. The author of Hybridity: Revisions Transformations, Prospects (2007) and Contemporary Cinema of Africa and the Diaspora (2014), her work has appeared in journals such as Diacritics, French Forum, Levinas Studies, Œuvres et critiques, Research in African Literatures, Journal of French and Francophones Studies, Cinema Journal, Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Studies, Contemporary Literary Studies, and PMLA. She was the Director of the Newhouse Center for the Humanities at Wellesley College and currently serves on the Executive Council of the MLA.

Dec 5, 2022
1:30PM
– 2:30PM
226 Burrowes Building

Please join us before Dr. Anjali Prabhu’s talk for a gathering with light refreshments.

Nov 14, 2022
2:30PM
– 3:30PM
226 Burrowes Building

Paget Henry is Professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at Brown University. He is the author of Caliban’s Reason: Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy; Shouldering Antigua and Barbuda: The Life of V.C. Bird; The Art of Mali Olatunji: Painterly photography from Antigua and Barbuda. He is also the Editor of the CLR James Journal, a publication of the Caribbean Philosophical Association. 

Nov 11, 2022
3:00PM
– 4:00PM

Emma Fivek, Accenture Consultant, Paris, France

Nov 8, 2022
11:00AM
– 12:00PM

Powers of Fiction: Scholastic Novels and Forgotten Women
in Third Republic France (1870 to 1914)”

This project explores a large corpus or about twenty French scholastic novels never before studied from a literary perspective. The Scholastic novel is a primarily woman-led literary genre that appeared in the second half of the nineteenth century that has now fallen into disuse. These publications were innovative hybrid texts that combined recreational appeal and pedagogical function, weaving together narrative and didactic occurrences. This genre reached peak popularity during the Third Republic and focused on both transmitting the knowledge and instilling values, aligned with the new national curriculum. Grounded in feminist theories, narratology, and literary analysis, Laurie argues that the lessons disseminated and by each book were in fact not all “aligned” and vary greatly depending on the author as they used fiction as a vehicle for political and ideological explorations.


Nov 3, 2022
7:00PM
– 8:00PM

Come learn about our French Language and Cultural Immersion program in Besançon this summer!

Oct 28, 2022
3:00PM
– 4:30PM
226 Burrowes Bldg

In her new book, La poétique de la cale: Variations sur le bateau négrier (Rivages, Oct 2022), Fabienne Kanor investigates a series of lieux de mémoire related to the Transatlantic Slave Trade and examines the way the experience of the Middle Passage is represented in contemporary literary, cinematographic and artistic productions of Francophone Africa, the French West Indies and the United States.

Oct 27, 2022
3:00PM
– 4:00PM
Zoom

“Working for a French Multinational Corporation: Lindsay Andersen, E-Merchandising Manager, Christian Dior Couture

Oct 24, 2022
2:30PM
– 4:00PM

The Department of French and Francophone Studies presents Véronique Tadjo (author, artist, and Honorary Professor at University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg) on “Tadjo vs Pokou: Transgressing the Myth,” as part of Fabienne Kanor’s African Enlightenment seminar. 

Oct 19, 2022
2:30PM
– 3:30PM
226 Burrowes Building

In 1983—as France struggled with race-based crimes, police brutality, and public unrest—youths from Vénissieux (working-class suburbs of Lyon) led the March for Equality and Against Racism, the first national demonstration of its type in France.

As Abdellali Hajjat reveals, the historic March for Equality and Against Racism symbolized for many the experience of the children of postcolonial immigrants. Inspired by the May ’68 protests, these young immigrants stood against racist crimes, for equality before the law and the police, and for basic rights such as the right to work and housing. Hajjat also considers the divisions that arose from the march and offers fresh insight into the paradoxes and intricacies of movements pushing toward sweeping social change.

Translated into English for the first time, The Wretched of France contemplates the protest’s lasting significance in France as well as its impact within the context of larger and comparable movements for civil rights, particularly in the US.

Thank to the Center for Humanities and Information and the Department of French and Francophone Studies for making this talk possible.