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Congratulations to Anna Navrotskaya!

Congratulations to Anna Navrotskaya for successfully defending her dissertation entitled La fonction mythique des arts du spectacle: l’identité diasporique et la production artistique interculturelle. Bravo, Anna!

Comprehensive Rotrou bibliography published by Prof. Vuillemin

“Jean de Rotrou: Bibliographie Critique,” a comprehensive annotated bibliography by Jean-Claude Vuillemin, is now available through Penn State University Libraries' open access publishing service at openpublishing.psu.edu/rotrou. A poet and a dramatist, Rotrou (1609-1650) wrote more than 30 plays during his short lifetime and was regarded by his contemporaries as one of the most influential French playwrights. Read more here.

 

Congratulations to Nicole Force and Laura Shaffer!

We extend our warm congratulations to two SLL staff members for their recent College of Liberal Arts Staff Awards. Nicole Force has won the College of the Liberal Arts Staff Excellence in Leadership and Mentoring award, our college's most prestigious award. Laura Schaffer was awarded the College of the Liberal Arts Outstanding Customer Service award. Both awards are well deserved and were given at the annual College of Liberal Arts Staff Awards reception on February 21st.

Assistant Professor Tracy Rutler offers "Bad Mothers" course in Dept. of WGSS

Rutler

Tracy Rutler, who holds a joint appointment in the Dept. of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, is currently offering WMNST 497: Bad Mothers, a course that explores various representations of (bad) motherhood in literature, film, television, pop culture and theoretical texts.  Read about Prof. Rutler's course "Bad Mothers" here.

Student Spotlight: FFS minor Kristen Sanchez in Besançon

Along with fourteen other Penn State students, Kristen spent the summer of 2016 on the Penn State Global Programs faculty-led program in Besançon. She credits the program with giving her proficiency in French and introducing her to a very special part of France. She writes "Studying in a small town was a very reassuring factor while being so far from home. The safety and comfort of Besançon made studying there that much more enjoyable. My group and I were able to get to know the town for all it was worth, and by the end of our stay I truly felt as though it was our own hometown." You can read more about here experiences here

Professor Jean-Claude Vuillemin gives lecture "Le "trip gréco-latin" de Michel Foucault et la problématique du sujet" at the CESPRA

 

Vuillemin CESPRA

Liberal Arts Research Professor Jean-Claude Vuillemin is giving a talk entitled "Le "trip gréco-latin" de Michel Foucault et la problématique du sujet" at the Centre d'études sociologiques et politiques-Raymon Aron , Thursday, December 15th. More information is available here.

Department head Kathryn Grossman on the use of _Les Misérables_ music in political campaigns

Department head Kathryn Grossman on the use of _Les Misérables_ music in political campaigns

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally Friday in Miami. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

Professor Kathryn Grossman was recently quoted in the Los Angeles TImes in an article about the use of music from Les Misérables in political campaigns past and present. Read her remarks here!

Denis Provencher accepts headship at the University of Arizona

Denis Provencher, who obtained his doctorate from the Department in 1998, has begun a new position as Professor of French and Head of the Department of French and Italian at the University of Arizona. Dr. Provencher has authored two books, Queer Maghrebi French: Language, Temporalities, Transfiliations (forthcoming in 2016) and Queer French: Globalization, Language, and Sexual Citizenship in France (2007), as well as numerous articles and book chapters on 19th, 20th, and 21st century French and Francophone Studies and on Queer Theory and Gender Studies. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the journal Contemporary French Civilization.

New Academic Positions for Three FFS Ph.D.s

Warmest congratulations to Amanda Shoaf Vincent (Ph.D. 2010), Ying Wang (Ph.D. 2011) and Zac Hagins (Ph.D. 2014), all of whom have moved into tenure-track positions beginning this academic year. Dr. Shoaf Vincent is an Assistant Professor of French in the Department of Romance Languages at Wake Forest University, having previously taught in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at the University of Florida. Dr. Wang is an Assistant Professor of French and Chinese in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures at Pace University. Dr. Hagins is an Assistant Professor of French in the Department of World Languages at the University of Arkansas (Little Rock), having previously taught at Rhodes College.

Félicitations, Dr. Stafford!

Félicitations, Dr. Stafford!

Dr. Andrew Stafford with his adviser and dissertation director, Dr. Bénédicte Monicat

Our warmest congratulations accompany Andrew Stafford, who received his doctoral diploma at the August 2016 graduation ceremonies. A specialist in nineteenth-century French literature and gender studies, Andrew is a Visiting Assistant Professor of French at Lycoming College.

FFS graduate Bruni shares internship experience in Paris

Recent FFS graduate and Schreyer Honors Scholar Michelle Bruni ('16, B.A. in Language and Linguistics) sat down with us and answered some questions about her recent internship in Paris. She shares insights about working in France and how her studies in the department prepared her for life abroad. 

What was the nature of your internship and how did you arrange it?

This past summer I completed a 3-month long internship in Paris, France. I worked in a linguistics laboratory that is funded by the CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure and Université Paris 3. The research in the lab focuses on linguistics and Natural Language Processing. I actually found this internship through a listserv I joined called Paris Linguists. Every day I would receive several emails about new papers, conferences and job postings. Eventually there was an advertisement for this position and I just applied for it! I was one of ten other interns in the lab, all of whom were French students.

 What were your duties and tasks?

I worked in the lab five days per week, around 7-8 hours each day. My job was to choose four texts, two in French, two in English, and annotate the corpus by creating co-reference chains. For example, in the sentence “John called his mother”, I would create a chain between the words “John” and “his”, since the two words refer to the same person. I would also create a separate chain for “his mother” if she was mentioned later on in the text. The texts I chose were Sarrasine by Honore Balzac, La Morte Amoureuse by Theophile Gautier, The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. Only the two French texts would be used for research in the lab, but being that English is my first language, my director wanted me to compare and contrast how co-reference is marked in both French and English.

 What was it like to work in France? What particular challenges or differences did you notice?

I had studied abroad in Paris for my entire junior year of college, but working in Paris was a completely different experience. One of the major differences I noticed was that the French begin work later in the morning, and end later at night. Most of the researchers didn’t arrive to the office until 11am, and others would sometimes leave at 7pm or 8pm. I remember arriving my first day around 9am and no one was there! Another thing that was particular to this lab was that everyone ate lunch together every day at the same time. There weren’t more than 20 people in the lab, so it was a great way to get to know everyone and talk about other things than work. It was also pretty interesting to see what French people eat for lunch compared to Americans – everything was organic. The only difficulty I had at times was the language barrier. Communicating on a daily basis posed no problems, but naturally there are some words and expressions that I don’t know, and that can be frustrating.

What helped you feel prepared for your internship?

 I felt very prepared for my internship, and I have my French studies at Penn State to thank for that. Being able to speak the language is one barrier to overcome, but so is understanding the culture. I really appreciate how Penn State’s French program offers a little bit of everything: culture, literature and linguistics. Learning about French history offers an insight into French values, and more often than not can help you understand why the French are the way they are or do the things they do. Also, knowing a little bit about French history and French literature is particularly useful in conversation. French people are very impressed when Americans can talk about their history and culture! I was surprised by how many questions the other French interns had about American culture, only before realizing they don’t learn about American culture like we do in our French classes.

What are your plans now that you've returned?

I completed my undergraduate studies this past August, and now I am working as the lab manager for one of the psycholinguistics laboratories in the Department of Spanish, Italian & Portuguese at Penn State. I hope to start graduate school next year and work towards a PhD in Cognitive Psychology, specifically studying the neurology of bilingualism.

Do you have any advice you have for students wanting to pursue similar opportunities?

First, do it! One of my biggest worries was not being able to finance my international internship, but thanks to funding from the College of the Liberal Arts, the French Department, and the Schreyer Honors College, I was able to live comfortably for the three months I was abroad. If it’s that important to you, you can find way to fund your internship. I would also emphasize how useful listservs can be when searching for an internship. The type of internship I was looking for was very specific and difficult to find, which goes to show if you search high and low you will find one!

Prof. Boittin interviewed in Libération about "Tumulte noir à Paris"

Associate Prof. Jennifer Boittin's will be a resident fellow at the Paris Institute for Advanced Study during 2016-2017. Recently she answered questions regarding the "Tumulte noir à Paris" in Libération's Africa4 blog. You can read her interview here.

French minor describes value of gen ed courses in Collegian article

minor

Penn State French minor Candace McPhillips writes about how Penn State's general education requirement provided her with the opportunity to further develop her interest in French. Read her story here!

Burrowes Building Dedication Ceremony

Burrowes

The Penn State community came together on April 16th to rededicate the Burrowes Building. After gathering under a tent on the patio to listen to remarks by President Barron, Dean Welch and others, guests toured the newly-renovated building and met with graduate students from the Department of French and Francophone Studies who presented their research in poster sessions.

French and Francophone Studies Major Stacy Justo featured in Liberal Arts Voices

Stacy Justo, majoring in French and Francophone Studies and Economics, with minors in Arabic and Business and the Liberal Arts, discusses the pivotal role that study abroad has played in her education. Read more about her semester in Montpellier here

Students in "France and the Holocaust" class travel to France with Prof. Willa Silverman

 

Over spring break, seven Penn State undergraduate students and one graduate teaching assistant traveled to Paris to participate in a week-long study tour led by Willa Z. Silverman, Malvin E. and Lea P. Bank Professor of French and Jewish Studies. Read more about their embedded course trip here.

Congratulations to Prof. Allen Stoekl and Anna Navrotskaya!

Stoekl et al

Congratulations to Prof. Allen Stoekl who was recognized as Professor Emeritus of French and Comparative Literature, and to graduate student Anna Navrotskaya for winning the Harold F. Martin Teaching Award. Both were recognized at the College's awards ceremony on April 5th.

Congratulations to Becky Bressler and Becky Cross!

 Becky BresslerBecky Cross

We extend our warm congratulations to two SLL staff members for their recent College of Liberal Arts Staff Awards. Becky Cross (pictured above right with son Christopher) has won the College of the Liberal Arts Exceptional Service Award and Becky Bressler (pictured above left)  has been awarded the LASER (Liberal Arts Staff Employee Recognition) award. Both awards are well deserved and were given at the annual College of Liberal Arts Staff Awards reception on February 23rd.  

Congratulations to Laura Call!

Congratulations to Laura Call, who successfully defended her dissertation, "Waste on a Human Scale: Heterotopia and Refuse in 21st-century French Self-writing," directed by Vincent Bruyère (Emory University), in December 2015. Laura is a Teaching Assistant Professor of French at North Carolina State University. Toutes nos félicitations, Laura!

Congratulations to Andrew Stafford!

Warm congratulations to Andrew Stafford, a doctoral student in his final year in our department who has begun a position as Visiting Assistant Professor of French at Lycoming College.

Visit Andrew's page on the Lycoming College website at: http://www.lycoming.edu/profile/faculty/staffordAndrew.aspx

French major Katherine Huskin wins prestigious Gilman study abroad scholarship

Huskin

French and Francophone Studies major Katherine Huskin, currently studying in Rabat, Morocco, is among approximately 800 American undergraduate students from 355 colleges and universities across the United States selected to receive the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to study or intern abroad during the spring 2016 academic term. Gilman scholars receive up to $5,000 to apply toward their study abroad or internship program costs. Scholarship recipients have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of other cultures, countries, languages and economies — making them better prepared to assume leadership roles within government and the private sector. You can read the full news article here. Congratulations Katherine!

Candlelight Vigil Held at Old Main

On Tuesday, November 17th, Members of the Penn State community gathered on the steps of Old Main to hold a candlelight vigil for the victims of the attacks in Paris, Beirut and other acts of terror around the world. The event was organized by several student organizations, among them the PSU French club. For more pictures and information click here

Theresa Brock selected to participate in Folger Institute symposium

Congratulations to Theresa Brock, who will participate, in November 2015, in a funded symposium entitled "Periodization 2.0" at the Folger Institute/Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. According to the Folger website, this gathering of scholars aims to "interrogate the intellectual consequences of the habits and practices of periodization," especially with regard to concepts such as "Renaissance" and "Early Modern."

Lauren Tilger wins best graduate student paper prize from ACEF-XIX

Congratulations to Lauren Tilger, who received the award for the best paper presented by a graduate student at the conference of the Association Canadienne des Études Francophones XIXe Siècle in Ottawa, Canada, in May 2015. Lauren’s paper was entitled “Discours sur l’hermaphrodite, discours de l’hermaphrodite: Les Mémoires d’une travestie dans Clémentine, Orpheline et androgyne.”

40 Years of Contemporary French Civilization Conference

A group that included nearly twenty department faculty, current graduate students, and graduate alumni participated in a conference Sept. 3-6, in Baltimore, to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of the journal Contemporary French Civilization. The conference was organized by department alumnus Denis M. Provencher, Associate Professor of French and Intercultural Communication, and Affiliate Associate Professor in the Gender and Women's Studies Program and in the Language, Literacy, and Culture Doctoral Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Country.

 

FFS minor Maria Cosma serves as a Student Ambassador at the World Expo in Milan

French and Francophone Studies minor Maria Cosma describes the once-in-a-lifetime experience of serving as a Student Ambassador at the World Expo in Milan:

"I spent the summer of 2015 working as a student ambassador at the USA Pavilion at the World Expo in Milan, Italy. The expo theme was "Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life," and it brought together 145 countries to discuss issues of food security and food culture. I was part of 120 student ambassadors, collectively speaking 28 different languages, who represented the United States. Together, we interacted with over 20,000 international visitors per day and facilitated discussions about America's role as a major food producer. One of the most rewarding aspects of this job was describing the technology behind the football field-sized vertical farm which formed the right wall of the pavilion. Another highlight was meeting Michelle Obama and the presidential delegation who visited the pavilion on June 18th. We had the pleasure of giving the First Lady a tour of the pavilion and hosting a Q&A session about her efforts in combating childhood obesity and malnutrition."

Obama

FFS major TJ Sullivan wins Rock Ethics Institute Honors Thesis Award

The Rock Ethics Institute's Honors Thesis Research Awards are presented to undergraduate students in the Paterno Fellows Program who are researching ethics-related topics in their theses. The award provides financial support for thesis research and related activities.  Following the completion of their theses, awardees are asked to present their research at a Rock Ethics Institute event and contribute a blog post on their research for the Rock Ethics Institute Everyday Ethics page.  French and Francophone Studies major TJ Sullivan is among the four most recent winners. You can read more about his project here. Congratulations TJ!

Dept. of French and Francophone Studies Students share their experiences with the TAPIF program

Dept. of French and Francophone Studies Students share their experiences with the TAPIF program

Chris Tutolo and students at the Lycée Guillaume le Conquérant in Lillebonne, France

One of the many post-graduation opportunities available to French minors and majors is participation in the TAPIF (Teaching Assistant Program in France) program. Students who are selected in the program are assigned to a primary or secondary school in France and serve as an English language-teaching assistant. We have an excellent placement record in this program and are pleased to share recent student experiences which testify to the many benefits, both personal and professional, of the program.

  

Annemarie Butkiewicz (French and Journalism major, '15) has been assigned to the Académie d'Aix-Marseille for the 2015-2016 school year. She notes that one aspect of the program that attracts her is that she would like to use her French in a daily setting. She feels that "one of the really cool things about the program is that it's mutually beneficial. I can share my knowledge of the English language and American culture while experiencing daily French life and meeting new people". French minor Megan Romania (Philosophy, '15) will also serve as a Teaching Assistant next year with the hope of improving her French. She indicated that the program is fulfilling other goals as well: " I am also hoping to travel more while abroad and really see what France and Europe have to offer! I've considered completing graduate school and permanently moving to Europe, so traveling will really help me get a better idea of where I'd ultimately like to end up. I'm looking for an adventure, and TAPIF is part of this journey ".

  

Current 2014-2015 participants John Elkhoury (French '14) and Paul Mcelhinny (History '13 with a minor in French) both state that the program has been invaluable to them on a personal and professional level. John, who was placed at the Lycée Carriat in Bourg-en Bresse, writes "...TAPIF rocked my world. I gained the ability to adapt to a new environment, make new friends, and hone my French skills. I truly lived on my own and outside of any of my normal safety nets so it was nice to get by alone for a while". Paul states that he gained a greater sense of purpose and confidence in himself while teaching at the primary level in Toulouse. "All in all", he writes, "working and teaching in my three primary schools was a wonderful experience, both personally and professionally, that I will carry with me for the rest of my life. In the words of François Hollande, "La France n'est pas une nostalgie, la France est une chance et un avenir," something which I most certainly found to be true for myself". Paul will begin graduate studies in Comparative Literature at the University of South Carolina in the fall.

Former Dept. of French and Francophone Studies Student Marshal Chris Tutolo ('13) taught in the Académie de Rouen in Lillebonne and found that he drew upon instruction he had received at Penn State while teaching his classes at the Lycée Guillaume le Conquérant as he used materials he learned in literature classes at Penn State "in order to shape the way I taught mine." Chris is currently serving as the Responsable des programmes culturels at the Alliance française de Minneapolis/St. Paul.

Students interested in the TAPIF program will find more information about the program here. Please feel free to contact Dr. Heather McCoy (hjm10@psu.edu) with additional questions.

Congratulations to our 2015 graduates!

Congratulations to our 2015 graduates! Please visit our departmental photo stream to see pictures from our awards ceremony and graduation reception.

Table ronde: Dr. Odile Cazenave, "Essai-fiction et fiction-essai, écrivain critique et critique écrivain: quelles implications pour la production littéraire africaine?"

Table ronde: Dr. Odile Cazenave, "Essai-fiction et fiction-essai, écrivain critique et critique écrivain: quelles implications pour la production littéraire africaine?"

Dr. Odile Cazenave and Dr. Bruno Jean-François

Dr. Odile Cazenave gave a guest talk "Essai-fiction et fiction-essai, écrivain critique et critique écrivain: quelles implications pour la production littéraire africaine?" for our Table ronde series on April 22nd, 2015. Such a pleasure to welcome a former student back to State College!

Installation of French Honor Society Pi Delta Phi

Pi Delta Phi

First Members Pi Delta Phi

The Department of French and Francophone Studies is pleased to announce the installation of Omicron Sigma, a chapter of the French National Honor Society Pi Delta Phi. The chapter was founded and new members were initiated on March 20th in a ceremony conducted by regional vice president, Prof. Eileen Angelini. Pi Delta Phi was founded in 1906 and is dedicated to the promotion of excellence in the study of the French language and French and Francophone culture.

Congratulations Willa Silverman

Congratulations to Professor Willa Silverman, who gave the plenary talk on “Doors to Dreams: Flight, Evasion and the Bibliographic Imaginary in Fin-de-Siècle France” at the 40th Annual Nineteenth-Century French Studies Colloquium in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October.

Congratulations to Professor Willa Silverman, who gave the plenary talk on “Doors to Dreams: Flight, Evasion and the Bibliographic Imaginary in Fin-de-Siècle France” at the 40th Annual Nineteenth-Century French Studies Colloquium in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in October.

Undergraduate Research Fair

This semester two of our undergraduate students participated in the 2013 Undergraduate Research Fair. Congratulations are in order for Julia Schrank as she won first place in the Arts and Humanities category as well as first place for the Library's Information Literacy Award for her research for her Schreyer Honors College thesis on "Menus objets ou menus, objets d'art".

This semester two of our undergraduate students participated in the 2013 Undergraduate Research Fair. Congratulations are in order for Julia Schrank as she won first place in the Arts and Humanities category as well as first place for the Library's Information Literacy Award for her research for her Schreyer Honors College thesis on "Menus objets ou menus, objets d'art".

Suzanne Richards, pictured right with Dean Long, presented her project "Henri Vever and the Parisian Art World of the Late Nineteenth Century".

Both students are the students of Professor Willa Silverman. Toutes nos félicitations!

Summer Internship in Paris

My name is Meghan Kane and I am a junior and French minor at Penn State University. Although I am a Food Science major and am not required to take classes for a second language, I decided my freshman year to pursue a minor in French, because of my love for the culture and language. The minor just started as something for me and a way to balance out my science-based classes; but it evolved into so much more than that.

            My name is Meghan Kane and I am a junior and French minor at Penn State University. Although I am a Food Science major and am not required to take classes for a second language, I decided my freshman year to pursue a minor in French, because of my love for the culture and language. The minor just started as something for me and a way to balance out my science-based classes; but it evolved into so much more than that.

            In addition to wanting to continue to study French in college, I also was interested in having a study abroad experience. However, because of scheduling constraints for the Food Science major, it would have been difficult to commit to a full semester in a French-speaking country. Thankfully, through the College of Agriculture, there was a short-term study abroad offered in the spring semester that dealt with the topic of “Comparing US and French Agricultural Systems.” This program had classes throughout the spring semester at University Park that discussed agricultural issues in the US and then after the semester ended, the class went over to Paris to study at AgroParis Tech for two weeks, where we talked about the same issues from the French perspective. In addition to learning about current agricultural policies and topics, I also volunteered to teach the rest of the class some basic French phrases in the hopes that they would feel a little bit more comfortable while in Paris. These small lessons before each class were a huge help in the end, as students were able to be polite in day-to-day activities and could order their food in French! After the two weeks in Paris, I felt like I had gotten to use my French skills and appreciate the Parisian and French culture even more than before.

            Then, just when I thought that my study abroad experience had come to a close, my professors from the US and French Agricultural Comparison class asked me if I would be interested in being the teaching assistant for the class the following spring. They said that they loved the addition of the French lessons at the beginning of each of our classes in the US and wanted to me to join them in Paris again, but this time with almost all expenses paid. Because of my French knowledge and enthusiasm about the language, I had another wonderful opportunity to explore the city of Paris, enjoy its delicious food, and take part in its rich history and culture.

            I believe that without my background in French, some of the experiences and chances that I have had here at Penn State, like my two short-term study abroad trips, may not have occurred. Next summer in 2013, I will be working at Mars Chocolate where I will be a food sensory intern. In this position I will be working with their chocolate products and consumers to understand what qualities the candies possess that make them appealing to purchase and to consume. In addition, because Mars is an international company, I will also be working on how to translate and globalize scales that are used during sensory testing. In this way, I will most likely have the opportunity to apply my French skills in a food science setting so that products can be tested and rated on an international scale.

            Today, as I continue to take French classes with my food science background, I keep finding more and more links between the language and the science and I cannot wait to see where they will take me next!

Student Spotlight!

The Dept. of French and Francophone Studies is delighted to congratulate graduate students Sandra Rousseau (left) and Sophia Khadraoui (right), for their recent awards. Sandra Rousseau has been awarded the Harold F. Martin Graduate Assistant Outstanding Teaching Award, a competitive university-wide teaching prize for outstanding teaching that is jointly sponsored by the Graduate School and the Office of the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education.

The Dept. of French and Francophone Studies is delighted to congratulate graduate students Sandra Rousseau (left) and Sophia Khadraoui (right), for their recent awards. Sandra Rousseau has been awarded the Harold F. Martin Graduate Assistant Outstanding Teaching Award, a competitive university-wide teaching prize for outstanding teaching that is jointly sponsored by the Graduate School and the Office of the Vice President and Dean for Undergraduate Education. Sandra was also recently awarded third place in the Arts and Humanities category at the 2013 Graduate Exhibit. Sophia Khadraoui is one of two College of the Liberal Arts graduate students to win the Outstanding Teaching Award for Graduate Students. The award is given to students whose accomplishments in the classroom are deemed to be exceptional and who have thus made a significant contribution to the educations of undergraduate students at Penn State.

Professor Emeritus of French receives Lifetime Service Award

Norris Lacy, the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor Emeritus of French and Medieval Studies at Penn State, has received the North American Branch of the International Arthurian Society’s Award for Lifetime Service to Arthurian Studies.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Norris Lacy, the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor Emeritus of French and Medieval Studies at Penn State, has received the North American Branch of the International Arthurian Society’s Award for Lifetime Service to Arthurian Studies. The society comprises nearly 1,200 scholars interested in the study of the Arthurian realm in history, literature, art, film and popular culture; more than 300 libraries subscribe to its annual Bibliographical Bulletin.

Read the Full Article Here!

Mapping Decadence

Huet, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of French and Francophone Studies, is writing her dissertation on the works of and the relationships between some of the writers, publishers and illustrators of the Decadent movement in late nineteenth-century France. She found that the writers’ proximity to their publishers played a role in shaping their collaborations.

Huet, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of French and Francophone Studies, is writing her dissertation on the works of and the relationships between some of the writers, publishers and illustrators of the Decadent movement in late nineteenth-century France. She found that the writers’ proximity to their publishers played a role in shaping their collaborations. 


[Read complete story here]

Liberal Arts Grad Students Win Outstanding Teaching Awards

Three Liberal Arts graduate students have been recognized with the 2012 Harold F. Martin Graduate Assistant Outstanding Teaching Awards. We are pleased to announce that Brandy Brown, a Ph.D student in the Department of French and Francophone Studies, is among them.

Three Liberal Arts graduate students have been recognized with the 2012 Harold F. Martin Graduate Assistant Outstanding Teaching Awards. We are pleased to announce that Brandy Brown, a Ph.D student in the Department of French and Francophone Studies, is among them. The full article is available on the Liberal Arts news page.

French major working to help families affected by 9/11 at her summer internship

Majoring in English and French, I had anticipated perhaps interning for a publishing company in New York or finding a job in a writing or writing-related field in a city for this summer. I perused Hearst Publications, Condé Nast, and even Madison Square Garden for various opportunities. I wanted to work somewhere big--high profile, serious office

Majoring in English and French, I had anticipated perhaps interning for a publishing company in New York or finding a job in a writing or writing-related field in a city for this summer. I perused Hearst Publications, Condé Nast, and even Madison Square Garden for various opportunities. I wanted to work somewhere big--high profile, serious office. It turns out that I found myself in the complete opposite setting, yet content and proud of the job that I landed.

I am a research assistant for Voices of September 11th, a non-profit located in New Canaan, Connecticut.

 

Read the rest of the article on the Liberal Arts Undergraduate Studies blog.

Freed makes major gifts to French and Francophone studies department

A lifelong love of French culture and literature has led Marian Trygve Freed, of State College, to make two major gifts to support faculty and graduate students in the Department of French and Francophone Studies in Penn State’s College of the Liberal Arts.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- A lifelong love of French culture and literature has led Marian Trygve Freed, of State College, to make two major gifts to support faculty and graduate students in the Department of French and Francophone Studies in Penn State’s College of the Liberal Arts. Using an inheritance from her late father, Freed established the Marian Trygve Freed Early Career Professorship and the Marian Trygve Freed Centennial Graduate Endowment, both in the Department of French and Francophone Studies.

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Erin Collins wins Oswald Award for student leadership

Erin Collins of Bethesda, Md., was named a 2012 Oswald Award winner in the area of scholarship. She was the student marshal representing the College of the Liberal Arts at the fall 2011 University Park campus commencement.

Erin Collins of Bethesda, Md., was named a 2012 Oswald Award winner in the area of scholarship. She was the student marshal representing the College of the Liberal Arts at the fall 2011 University Park campus commencement. A Schreyer Honors College Scholar, she earned overall GPAs of 4.0 for three bachelor of art degrees — in German, French and international studies, with minors in Middle East studies and Arabic language — and for a concurrent master of arts degree in German.

Continue the article here!

E-Projects developed by graduate student instructors in their undergraduate classes

FR 139 – France and the French-Speaking World and FR 410 – La Presse et les Médias Français

FR 139 – France and the French-Speaking World
Instructors: Sophia Khadraoui & Sandra Rousseau

FR 139 E-Newsletter – Special Edition Spring 2011

By studying the artistic, social and intellectual components of French and Francophone cultures, FR139 students develop an appreciation of the intricate relationships that unite France and the French-speaking world, a crucial acquisition in today's "global village."
At the end of the semester, two days were devoted to the presentation of posters. Students teamed with three other classmates and set up a poster on a French or Francophone theme. During these two sessions, all students had to display and present their work to the public which was composed of the class members, instructors and the general public.

France and the French-Speaking worldFrance and the French Speaking world

FR 410 – La Presse et les Médias Français
Editeur et Rédacteur en Chef : Sophia Khadraoui

Le Lion Déchaîné. Semestriel - N° 1 - Automne 2010
 E-journal publié par la classe FR 410

L’idée est de mettre en pratique concrète les différents aspects de la presse étudiés en classe et de se familiariser avec le langage et l’écriture journalistiques français tout cela en créant un journal type presse écrite (Le Monde, Libération, Le Figaro etc.).
Ce projet qui s’étend sur tout le semestre est le fruit d’une collaboration commune à toute la classe. Au niveau individuel, chaque étudiant, en tant que journaliste, est responsable d’un ou de plusieurs articles.

La Presse et les Médias Français

Congratulations to Sophia Fortune and Fabrice Picon!

Congratulations are in order for two Ph.D. students for having successfully defended their dissertations. On March 4th, Sophia Fortune defended her dissertation entitled "Mémoires sculptées: Commémorer l'abolition de l'esclavage en France métropolitaine à travers le monument, 1998-2012"

Congratulations are in order for two Ph.D. students for having successfully defended their dissertations. On March 4th, Sophia Fortune defended her dissertation entitled "Mémoires sculptées: Commémorer l'abolition de l'esclavage en France métropolitaine à travers le monument, 1998-2012" On March 17th, Fabrice Picon successfully defended his dissertation "Claude Bourdet, intellectuel résistant: Éthique contestataire et journalisme, de la Résistance à la nouvelle gauche (1928-1958)". Toutes nos félicitations!

Congratulations to Schreyer Scholars Elizabeth Thorwart and Thomas Shutt

Schreyer Honors College Scholars Elizabeth Thorwart and Thomas Shutt honor the tradition of hitting the gong as they turn in their honors theses. Thorwart's thesis is entitled "Les Carnets de voyage de Frances Cahn: une jeune fille américaine en France au 19e siècle" and traces the journey of a young American girl as she records her experiences discovering France for the first time.

Schreyer Honors College Scholars Elizabeth Thorwart and Thomas Shutt honor the tradition of hitting the gong as they turn in their honors theses. Thorwart's thesis is entitled "Les Carnets de voyage de Frances Cahn: une jeune fille américaine en France au 19e siècle" and traces the journey of a young American girl as she records her experiences discovering France for the first time. Shutt's thesis "La France Juive: une publication qui a bouleversé le monde" examines the historiography of Edouard Drumont's text and its impact on anti-Semitism in France. Both students worked under the guidance of Professor Willa Silverman.

Amy Copley, senior in French and Int'l Politics,writes about her experience in Senegal improving food security.

Although our bountiful planet produces enough food for every man, woman, and child on earth—due to imbalances in our global food production systems—one in seven people do not get the food they need to live a healthy, active life. This paradox of want in a world of abundance has perplexed me throughout my academic career, and is what motivated me to study abroad in Senegal, a West African country, where a quarter of the population suffers from hunger or malnutrition.

Although our bountiful planet produces enough food for every man, woman, and child on earth—due to imbalances in our global food production systems—one in seven people do not get the food they need to live a healthy, active life. This paradox of want in a world of abundance has perplexed me throughout my academic career, and is what motivated me to study abroad in Senegal, a West African country, where a quarter of the population suffers from hunger or malnutrition. By spending a semester in Senegal, I hoped to develop a deeper understanding of the obstacles related to achieving domestic food security, and learn how the government, international organizations, and local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are working to overcome these challenges.

Continue reading about Amy's experiences here!

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Alumni Association Dissertation Award

The Department of French and Francophone Studies would like to congratulate Sophia Fortune (Khadraoui) for winning the prestigious Alumni Association Dissertation Award for her recently defended doctoral dissertation "Mémoires sculptées: Commémorer l'abolition de l'esclavage en France métropolitaine à travers le monument, 1998-2012".

The Department of French and Francophone Studies would like to congratulate Sophia Fortune (Khadraoui) for winning the prestigious Alumni Association Dissertation Award for her recently defended doctoral dissertation "Mémoires sculptées: Commémorer l'abolition de l'esclavage en France métropolitaine à travers le monument, 1998-2012". This award is considered to be among the most prestigious available to Penn State graduate students and recognizes outstanding achievement in scholarship and professional accomplishment. Fortune was honored at a special recognition dinner on April 5th as well as the College of the Liberal Arts Awards Luncheon at the Nittany Lion Inn on April 9th, 2014.

A Penn State student uses the latest in digitization and encoding technologies to create new research possibilities with the 160-year-old Magasin des Demoiselles.

A Penn State student uses the latest in digitization and encoding technologies to create new research possibilities with the 160-year-old Magasin des Demoiselles.

Read the full article on Current

2014 French and Francophone Studies Department Student Marshal

Leah is the daughter of Jim and Claire Pappas of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. A Paterno Fellow and a Schreyer Scholar, she is graduating with degrees in Linguistics, through the Bachelor of Philosophy program, and French and Francophone Studies with a minor in Spanish.

Leah is the daughter of Jim and Claire Pappas of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. A Paterno Fellow and a Schreyer Scholar, she is graduating with degrees in Linguistics, through the Bachelor of Philosophy program, and French and Francophone Studies with a minor in Spanish. Leah studied abroad in Montpellier, France, while completing an internship as a teaching assistant at a French elementary school. She also served as a French tutor for the Penn State Learning Center. She has worked in linguistics labs on campus for six semesters in the past four years, and through this work, she became the recipient of an NSF-PIRE fellowship to do research in Berlin, Germany. After graduation, she plans to teach English abroad before beginning graduate studies.

10 Questions with Erin Collins

She may have been working on her Penn State degree since the fall of 2005, but Erin Collins is anything but a slacker.

She may have been working on her Penn State degree since the fall of 2005, but Erin Collins is anything but a slacker.

After her freshman year, Erin spent the summer in Morocco, and by the fall of 2006, she was studying abroad in Paris. The spring and summer of 2007 found her in Berlin, Germany, where she remained until that fall, when she returned to University Park for a year. By fall of 2008, she was gone again, spending the year in Morocco. She then spent the 2009-2010 academic year in Happy Valley before leaving for Egypt for a year. Finally, she returned in the fall of 2011 to finish her final semester at Penn State.

Continue reading about Erin's experiences here!